MWH Global, a premier solutions provider focused on water and natural resources, today announced that it will be sponsoring Radiant Features of Los Angeles in its filming of a special edition of H2’s Modern Marvels series that will focus on the Panama Canal expansion project.

The special edition episode of Modern Marvels will focus on the engineering challenges that were faced as a part of updating the 100-year-old Panama Canal. With unprecedented access, the program takes you inside the multi-billion dollar Panama Canal Expansion Project and follows the ups and downs of a global team to understand what it takes to upsize one of the largest human constructions on the planet. The one-hour special edition episode is scheduled to air in early 2015 and will include never-before-seen footage, interviews with engineers, and original excavation footage on-site.

“We are incredibly humbled to be a part of this story,” said MWH Global chairman and CEO Alan Krause.  “The Panama Canal is a modern marvel that continues to make an impact on trade and shipping today and we are grateful to have been a part of the expansion.  I am proud of every person at MWH who was involved in this complex and transformative project.”

“H2’s series Modern Marvels is the perfect fit for this special; it allows us to bring this monumental project into the homes of people around the world,” said Bill Ferehawk, producer and co-founder of Radiant Features.  “This project is the type filmmakers’ dream of working on because we have the opportunity to share a unique and powerful story of an engineering wonder and make it real.”

In August, the Panama Canal Authority celebrated the centennial of the Panama Canal’s completion.  The documentary focuses on the technical engineering and design to carry the Panama Canal forward through to the next century and beyond.

MWH served as the lead technical designer for the third set of locks on the Panama Canal expansion project and leads the joint venture: CICP, Consultores Internacionales.  The third set of locks will expand the Canal’s overall capacity to accept larger cargo ships through two lock facilities – one on the Atlantic side and another on the Pacific. Each of these locks will have three chambers that provide water saving basins.

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