Tucson-based QuakeWrap Inc. is taking part in national research funding for small businesses developing innovative technologies that solve key environmental issues.


An infrastructure innovation coming out of the research labs of the Arizona-based company, and promising to help solve a major problem in city drinking water systems, has received federal funding from the research arm of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA).


RELATED: QuakeWrap Innovation Builds Pipe in the Field


QuakeWrap is one of 21 small businesses nationally that are receiving first stage or Phase I funding from the U.S. EPA’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program awards contracts annually through a two-stage competition. QuakeWrap’s water main repair proposal is the only one funded that deals with the repair of broken or leaking pipes.


Read the U.S. EPA press release naming all 21 grant recipients here.


The proposal, “Trenchless Water Main Point Repairs with SuperLaminate,” will explore the use of specialized fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) laminates for repair of water main leaks that cost cities and counties millions of dollars a year in drinking water loss.


The new repair method, if successful, will stop identified leaks in city main water pipes without the need for expensive excavation. The ability to avoid digging up and replacing pipe to stop leaks saves municipalities and other government organizations millions of dollars in infrastructure renewal and drinking water system costs.


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“The difference between our proposed pipe repair and past repair systems is like the difference between landlines and mobile phones,” said Mo Ehsani, Ph.D., P.E., S.E. and QuakeWrap’s president/CEO. “This project is developing an economical solution for repairing smaller diameter municipal water pipes, where due to their size, manned entry is not possible.”


The research grant will fund the development of QuakeWrap’s flexible FRP sheet, called SuperLaminate, for use with a device which can deliver the laminate into a smaller leaky pipe, “Like a stent placed in an artery,” Ehsani says.


Video showing the repair system in early concept can be found on the QuakeWrap YouTube channel. Ehsani, professor emeritus of civil engineering at the University of Arizona; and Firat Sever, Ph.D., P.E., QuakeWrap’s pipeline division manager are the lead investigators for the research project.


This is not QuakeWrap’s first innovation. InfinitPipe is a corrosion resistant, continuous composite pipe manufactured on-site, with no joints, at whatever length is needed. This trenchless innovation eliminates both excavation costs and pipe joints, which is the biggest cause of leaks in older pipelines.


SOURCE – QuakeWrap


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