NASSCO has published a new, two-page brochure, “What’s That Odor,” to help inform communities about the safety of styrene used in the steam cure process of cured-in-place pipe (CIPP).


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Available for contractors and system owners to download for free at nassco.org/styrene-safety, “What’s That Odor” uses consumer-friendly language and colorful illustrations to share with private property owners to address topics including:


• What is CIPP?

• The CIPP Installation Process

• What is That Odor and Why Can I Smell It Inside My House?

• What Can I Do to Prevent or Eliminate the Odor?

• What is Styrene?

• Why is the Odor So Strong?

• Is the Odor Harmful to My Family and Me?

• Additional Resources (links to styrene.org, epa.gov and more)


“It is important that we reassure private property owners and the public in general that CIPP is a proven and minimally disruptive process used to repair or replace our critical sewer infrastructure,” said Sheila Joy, NASSCO executive director. “Understandably so, the odor produced from styrene sometimes used in the curing process of CIPP can alarm people, so NASSCO’s Health and Safety Committee, Pipe Rehab Committee and CIPP Safety Workgroup have joined forces to produce this informative brochure.


RELATED: The Safety of CIPP


“They have also been busy providing other industry resources—including published reports on the safety of styrene used in the CIPP process, specifications and guidelines for the safe use and handling of styrene, and so much more—which can be found at nassco.org/styrene-safety. Safety is NASSCO’s number one priority, and we are doing everything we can to keep our workers and communities safe.”


In addition to online access, NASSCO is encouraging contractors and municipalities to download and print the brochure free-of-charge to educate the public on the value of CIPP and the steps they can take to prevent the odor from entering buildings, answer questions about safety and so much more.


SOURCE – NASSCO


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