The United States Fish and Wildlife Service at the Eagle Creek Fish Hatchery near Estacada, Ore., needed to upgrade old 36-in. welded steel pipes that bring fresh water from the creek into the facility. Michels Corp. excavated and replaced most of the pipe. The construction window was limited due to water needed for critical hatchery operations.

Because of the sensitive nature of the project location, an environmentally-friendly approach was needed, and CIPP was chosen as the best method. The project required National Science Foundation-approved materials and power and air to be generated onsite.

Due to logistical constraints, the pipe was prepared (wetout) onsite immediately prior to being installed into the host pipe. To create more room for the over-the-hole-wetout, Michels set the equipment parallel to the host pipe but offset by about 30 ft, requiring the wetout tube to make two 90-degree bends, two 45-degree bends and run down a set of stairs into the main intake structure. The pipe was then cured and cooled, ends were cut, the pipe was pressure tested and then put back into service supplying water to the hatchery.



Owner: United States Fish and Wildlife Service
Engineer: MWH Americas, Inc.
Contractor: Five Rivers Construction
Subcontractor: Michels Pipe Services

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